Last edited by Araran
Wednesday, August 5, 2020 | History

3 edition of Hybridisation Between Introduced Brown Hares and Native Mountain Hares in Sweden found in the catalog.

Hybridisation Between Introduced Brown Hares and Native Mountain Hares in Sweden

Carl-Gustaf Thulin

Hybridisation Between Introduced Brown Hares and Native Mountain Hares in Sweden

by Carl-Gustaf Thulin

  • 143 Want to read
  • 16 Currently reading

Published by Uppsala Universitet .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Life Sciences - Genetics & Genomics,
  • Science,
  • Science/Mathematics

  • Edition Notes

    SeriesComprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations, 531
    The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL12854224M
    ISBN 109155447074
    ISBN 109789155447076

    Brown Hare 1 Brown Hare (Lepus europaeus) ©Stefan Jacobs The Brown Hare is one of the three species of the family Leporidae living in Britain. Its closest relative the mountain hare (L. timidus) is native and is largely restricted to northern hills and to Ireland. The Rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) is widespread and was introduced by the Normans.   Andersen LW, Fredsted T, Wincentz T, Pertoldi C () Brown hares on the edge: genetic population structure of the Danish brown hare. Acta Theriol – CrossRef Google Scholar Andersson A-C, Thulin C-G, Tegelström H () Applicability of rabbit microsatellite primers for studies of hybridisation between an introduced and a native.

      While competitive exclusion by, and hybridization with, brown hares are considered primary candidates for the decline of southern mountain hare populations in Sweden, disease-mediated competition through, for example, GII.1 or Francisella tularensis may also play a role. Although GII.1 can infect and cause disease in both European brown hares. The European hare (Lepus europaeus), also known as the brown hare, is a species of hare native to Europe and parts of is among the largest hare species and is adapted to temperate, open country. Hares are herbivorous and feed mainly on grasses and herbs, supplementing these with twigs, buds, bark and field crops, particularly in winter. Their natural predators include large birds of.

    Thulin CG, Jaarola M, Tegelström H. The occurrence of mountain hare mitochondrial DNA in wild brown hares. Mol Ecol. ; – doi: /jXtx. Thulin CG, Tegelström H. High mtDNA haplotype diversity among introduced Swedish brown hares . ). The European brown hare Lepus europaeus was introduced to southern Sweden during the late 9th cen-tury and has expanded gradually northwards as a result of semi-natural dispersal and continued introductions. Since the initial introduction, hunters have reported hybrids between brown hares and native mountain hares.


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Hybridisation Between Introduced Brown Hares and Native Mountain Hares in Sweden by Carl-Gustaf Thulin Download PDF EPUB FB2

In Europe the mountain hare (Lepus timidus) exists in Great Britain, Norway, Sweden, Finland, parts of the Alps and in Eastern Europe, but not in Denmark. Interspecific hybridization has been demonstrated between native Swedish mountain hares and introduced brown hares (Lepus europaeus).

During the data collection in a study concerning Danish brown hares we identified 16 hares Cited by: (English) Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic) Abstract [en] To investigate the extent and effect of hybridisation between wild sympatric populations of introduced brown hares (Lepus europaeus) and native mountain hares (s) in Sweden, the geographic distribution of genetic variation in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and nuclear DNA microsatellite markers were.

For example, a study on mountain hares (Lepus timidus) in Scandinavia proved that hybridisation had been occurring with introduced brown hares (L. europaeus) by finding mountain hare mtDNA in. chondrial DNA (mtDNA) from native mountain hares (Lepus timidus) to introduced brown hares (L.

europaeus). We investigated mtDNA Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism among 62 Scandinavian mountain hares, 20 brown hares with moun-tain hare mtDNA and 19 presumed hybrids from 57 localities in Sweden and Norway. In Scandinavia, suspected hybrids between the native mountain hare Lepus timidus and the introduced brown hare L.

europaeus have been observed by hunters since the first introductions of brown. Hence, the genetic makeup of hares from these countries could have been either introgressed with mountain hare Lepus timidus Genetic structure of the Danish brown hare haplotypes (Sweden.

Interspecific hybridization has been demonstrated between native Swedish mountain hares and introduced brown hares (Lepus europaeus). During the data collection in a study concerning Danish brown hares we identified 16 hares with a single very divergent haplotype.

Results Phylogenetic analysis shows that the divergent. Through interspecific hybridization and subsequent backcrossing, genes and genomes may be transferred over the species barrier. In Sweden, the introduced brown hare Lepus europaeus hybridizes with the native mountain hare L.

investigate the direction and the extent of transfer of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) between the species, the mtDNA haplotypes were screened in brown hares. exclusion and hybridisation with naturalised brown hares (L.

europaeus) that were introduced during the late nineteenth century. Pre- and post-breeding spotlight surveys during in the north of. European hare Lepus europaeus populations have undergone recent declines but the species has successfully naturalised in many countries outside its native range.

It was introduced to Ireland during the mid-late nineteenth century for field sport and is now well established in Northern Ireland. The native Irish hare Lepus timidus hibernicus is an endemic subspecies of mountain hare L.

timidus. The brown hare, in some parts called the English hare or “thrush”, was introduced by Irish landlords for coursing in the later 19th century (to Powerscourt, for example, in ).

Their. Background: In Europe the mountain hare (Lepus timidus) exists in Great Britain, Norway, Sweden, Finland, parts of the Alps and in Eastern Europe, but not in Denmark. Interspecific hybridization has been demonstrated between native Swedish mountain hares and introduced brown hares (Lepus europaeus).

During the data collection in a study. Mountain hare. The hardy mountain hare is our only truly montane/arctic mammal and is restricted to Scotland’s high ground (generally above to m). This isn’t the case in Ireland, where the brown hare was absent.

Grey-brown in summer to blend with the heath, the mountain hare’s coat turns white in winter, to match the snow. The European hare (Lepus europaeus) has declined throughout its native range but invaded numerous regions where it has negatively impacted native wildlife.

In southern Sweden, it replaces the native mountain hare (L. timidus) through competition and hybridisation. We investigated temporal change in the invasive range of the European hare in Ireland, and compared its habitat use.

In Scandinavia, suspected hybrids between the native mountain hare Lepus timidus and the introduced brown hare L. europaeus have been observed by hunters since the first introductions of brown hares in the late 9th century. Several attempts to verify the status of these suspected hybrids have been unsuccessful.

Recently, however, the transmission of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from mountain hares. Brown Hare - Lepus europaeus Taxon: Lagomorpha General fact sheet (click to download) Field sign fact sheet (click to download) Habitat: Grassland, arable land.

Description: The brown hare has very long black-tipped ears; large, long, powerful hind legs. They are much redder than the mountain hare, and with a black-topped tail. There is yellow flecking to the fur, more so than grey-brown.

Hybridization with the European brown hare (Lepus europaeus) has been recognized as a major threat for the conservation of the endemic Irish hare (Lepus timidus hibernicus) (Smith and Johnston, ), it was pointed out as a factor potentially influencing the long-term decrease of mountain hare in Sweden (Thulin and Tegelström, ), and it.

Ireland is home to both the Irish hare, an endemic subspecies of mountain hare which is of conservation concern, and the European hare, which was introduced for field sports.

We know from previous studies that the European hare likely poses a threat to the Irish hare as the two species prefer similar habitats, there is a high degree of. Anna‐Carin Andersson, Carl‐Gustaf Thulin, Håkan Tegelstrom, Applicability of Rabbit Microsatellite Primers for Studies of Hybridisation between an Introduced and a Native Hare Species, Hereditas, /jx,3, (), ().

Freitas, H. Natural hybridization between the Iberian hare (Lepus granatensis) and the brown hare (L. europaeus) in northern Iberian Peninsula.

MSc thesis, Faculdade de Ciências do Porto, Porto, Portugal. Google Scholar. BACKGROUND: In Europe the mountain hare (Lepus timidus) exists in Great Britain, Norway, Sweden, Finland, parts of the Alps and in Eastern Europe, but not in Denmark.

Interspecific hybridization has been demonstrated between native Swedish mountain hares and introduced brown hares (Lepus europaeus).The mountain hare (Lepus timidus) is native to Sweden and is susceptible to European brown hare syndrome virus (EBHSV), also called Lagovirus europaeus GII While most mountain hare populations are found on the mainland, isolated populations also exist on islands.

Here we investigate a mortality event in mountain hares on the small island of. The predicted probabilities of mountain hare (sub-)species presence closely approximated the actual range extent of each (sub-)species (Fig.

1).Niche space for the European hare was predicted northward beyond its northern (invasive) range edge in Sweden extending west into southern Norway, southward beyond its southerly (natural) range edge in north-eastern Iberia and in .